CSF ANALYSIS

750 Rs

MRP

Discounted Price:

500 Rs

Pre-test preparation or requirements

N.A.

Normal range

N.A.

Significance of test

Typical Cerebrospinal Fluid Findings in Various Types of Meningitis:

Test Bacterial
TLC ≥1,000 per mm3
Differential Predominance of PMNs*
Protein Mild to marked elevation
CSF-to-serum glucose ratio Normal to marked decrease

Test Viral
TLC <100 per mm3
Differential Predominance of lymphocytes
Protein Normal to elevated
CSF-to-serum glucose ratio Usually normal

Test Fungal
TLC Variable
Differential Predominance of lymphocytes
Protein Elevated
CSF-to-serum glucose ratio Low

Test Tubercular
TLC Variable
Differential Predominance of lymphocytes
Protein Elevated
CSF-to-serum glucose ratio Low

Peripheral blood in the CSF after a “traumatic tap” will result in an artificial increase in WBCs by one WBC for every 500 to 1,000 RBCs in the CSF.
The WBC count seen in normal adult CSF is comprised of approximately 70 percent lymphocytes and 30 percent monocytes.
The majority of patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome will have 10 or fewer monocytes per mm3 and a minority of patients will have 11 to 50 monocytes per mm.
Up to 50 monocytes per mm3 are seen in about 25 percent of patients with multiple sclerosis.
Lymphocytosis is seen in viral, fungal, and tuberculous infections of the CNS, although a predominance of PMNs may be present in the early stages of these infections. CSF in bacterial meningitis is typically dominated by the presence of PMNs. However, more than 10 percent of bacterial meningitis cases will show a lymphocytic predominance, especially early in the clinical course and when there are fewer than 1,000 WBCs per mm3
Eosinophilic meningitis is defined as more than 10 eosinophils per mm3 or a total CSF cell count made up of more than 10 percent eosinophils. Parasitic infection should be suspected in this situation. Other possible causes may include viral, fungal, or rickettsial meningitis; having ventriculoperitoneal shunts with or without coexisting infection; malignancy; and adverse drug reactions.

Previous
Next